Tag: Computing and Internet

Last Days to Contribute to NZ Open Government Action Plan

Article – Open Source Open Society New Zealands Open Government Partnership Action Plan is open for consultation until the end of day on this Friday 26 August. If you care about transparency, accountability participation and better use of technology in the way our government is run then …Last Days to Contribute to NZ Open Government Action Plan New Zealand’s ‘Open Government Partnership’ Action Plan is open for consultation until the end of day on this Friday 26 August. If you care about transparency, accountability participation and better use of technology in the way our government is run then you should make a submission here. If you are in Wellington there is also a final full day co-creation workshop on this Friday where you can get involved at a deeper level. See the Press release published on Scoop yesterday here for further details. Our position as a leader in this space is at threat New Zealand has had very good fiscal and government accountability and transparency reputation, however recent developments such as the Panama Papers and increasingly poor public consultation processes are threatening this reputation. As Susanne Snively, chair of Transparency International New Zealand said at yesterday’s Open Source Open Society Conference in Wellington, our position as a leader in this space is slipping due to complacency and lack of ambition to look towards transparency and accountability in a modern...

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Patronage, Journalism and Open Society.

Article – James Littlewood A panel discussion this morning shone a very bright light on a very familiar problem: the problem of journalism; knowing whats going on; keeping the bastards honest. Marianne Ellion (of Action Station) hosted the discussion with Mark Jennings (Mediaworks), … A panel discussion this morning shone a very bright light on a very familiar problem: the problem of journalism; knowing what’s going on; keeping the bastards honest. Marianne Ellion (of Action Station) hosted the discussion with Mark Jennings (Mediaworks), Jan Rivers (Scoop) and Bernard Hickey (Hive News). The problem is all too familiar. But here...

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InternetNZ presents TPP views to Select Committee

Press Release – InternetNZ InternetNZ Chief Executive Jordan Carter and Issues Advisor James Ting-Edwards appeared today before Parliaments Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee as it conducts its examination of the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement.InternetNZ presents TPP views to Select Committee InternetNZ Chief Executive Jordan Carter and Issues Advisor James Ting-Edwards appeared today before Parliament’s Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee as it conducts its examination of the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement. “We made four key points to the Select Committee,” says Chief Executive Jordan Carter. “First, the longer copyright term required by the Agreement is not in New Zealand’s interests. The twenty-year extension to the duration of copyright will cost the country more than the gains it might offer to a few New Zealand creators. “Second, the criminalisation of breaches of digital locks (so-called “Technological Protection Measures” or TPMs) by ordinary users of technology marks a far-reaching change. For the first time, people who open these locks just to access a movie, song, or book will risk legal liability – even if they have the right to view the underlying content. These legal risks threaten innovation and inhibit competition. To make this system work, New Zealand will have to make extensive and clever use of the allowed exceptions – and will have to update those exceptions regularly. “Third, the negatives in the Agreement mentioned above can be balanced...

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Gordon Campbell on the security services review

Column – Gordon Campbell T o no-ones real surprise, the Cullen/Reddy review of the security services has recommended an extension of the powers of the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB), mainly to legally enable the agency to use its technological expertise … Gordon Campbell on the security services review, and Bernie Sanders’ victory against the TPP To no-one’s real surprise, the Cullen/Reddy review of the security services has recommended an extension of the powers of the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB), mainly to legally enable the agency to use its technological expertise to spy on New Zealanders. So… a review that was triggered by the GCSB breaking the letter (and the clear intent) of the existing law– which clearly forbade it to engage in the surveillance of New Zealanders – has now rewarded the miscreants, by legalizing their behavior. Yep, that’s the way to engender public confidence – give more power to the foxes, to enable them to better guard the henhouse. Why should we, in future, place our trust in organisations that have shown in the recent past that they either cannot understand or – more credibly – simply do not respect the boundaries placed on their activities by the current law? The Cullen/Reddy review makes much of the need to integrate the various laws governing the SIS and the GCSB, which are depicted as being confusing and...

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