Tag: University of Auckland

RCEP trade agreement threatens access to affordable medicine

Press Release – University of Auckland Medecins Sans Frontieres say: RCEP trade agreement threatens access to affordable medicines for half the worlds populationMedecins Sans Frontieres say: RCEP trade agreement threatens access to affordable medicines for half the world’s population Background information: As negotiators from 16 countries gather in Auckland, New Zealand, this week for the thirteenth round of negotiations of the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) trade deal, Médecins Sans Frontières, along with other health organisations, appeals for the removal of harmful intellectual property provisions that could potentially raise treatment costs by creating new forms of monopolies and delaying the entry of affordable generics in the market. If the intellectual property provisions proposed by Japan and South Korea are accepted, access to essential medicines will be restricted for millions of people across Asia and the world who rely on life-saving affordable generics made in India. RCEP is a regional trade agreement being negotiated between the 10 ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) countries and Australia, China, India, Japan, New Zealand and South Korea. RCEP countries are home to nearly 50% of the world’s population, including the most impoverished, vulnerable and marginalised communities living in the Least Developed Countries (LDCs). A leaked copy of the intellectual property text being discussed at the negotiations shows that Japan and South Korea have made several alarming proposals to include intellectual property rules that...

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University of Auckland Warns of Negative TPP Impact

Press Release – University of Auckland The University of Auckland May 20, 2015 University of Auckland Warns of Negative TPP Impact With the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiation drawing to a close, the University of Auckland has expressed serious concerns about its potential implications. … The University of Auckland May 20, 2015 University of Auckland Warns of Negative TPP Impact With the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiation drawing to a close, the University of Auckland has expressed serious concerns about its potential implications. Vice-Chancellor Professor Stuart McCutcheon says that while details of the agreement remain secret a number of leaks have given rise to serious concerns and highlighted just how damaging intellectual property provisions in the agreement could be. “We understand that the TPP will extend copyright from the ‘life of the author plus 50 years’ to ’life plus 70 years’ for works created by individuals and either 95 years after publication or 120 years after creation for corporately owned works (like Mickey Mouse). This is well beyond the internationally agreed period of ’life plus 50 years’ set out in existing international agreements.” Professor McCutcheon adds: “If this is what happens, it will lock up our cultural heritage for a further 20 years, denying all New Zealanders access. It means students, creators, performers, researchers and educational institutions will be denied access to culturally significant material – it’s this material...

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Health advocates lead call for TPPA transparency

Press Release – University of Auckland Several University of Auckland academics are among health advocates from New Zealand and Australia leading an international call for public release and wide discussion of the text of the secret Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA).Health advocates lead call for TPPA transparency Several University of Auckland academics are among health advocates from New Zealand and Australia leading an international call for public release and wide discussion of the text of the secret Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPPA). The call, in leading international medical journal The Lancet, (published tomorrow) is signed by 27 health leaders in Australia, Canada, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, USA, and Vietnam, including leaders of the World Medical Association and World Federation of Public Health Associations. Leaders are pressing for the TPPA discussions to be transparent and its broad health impacts to be assessed – before it is signed. One of the co-authors, public health physician Dr Pat Neuwelt from the University of Auckland, says the TPPA, like other ‘new generation’ trade deals, threatens governmental ability to deliver affordable health care and legislate to protect public health and reduce health inequities. “And all the while, the text is shrouded in secrecy.” “The negotiations are not about the way most of us think of trade – you and me buying and selling things,” she says. “Instead they [the TPPA negotiators] are protecting the massive investment...

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Challenges to equitable access to medicines

Press Release – University of Auckland Access to medicines by vulnerable groups in the community, increasing medicine costs, and the demand for new medicines are some of the challenges identified in an independent study of priority medicine policy issues in New Zealand.Challenges to equitable access to medicines Media Release University of Auckland 11 June 2014 Challenges to equitable access to medicines Access to medicines by vulnerable groups in the community, increasing medicine costs, and the demand for new medicines are some of the challenges identified in an independent study of priority medicine policy issues in New Zealand. The study, led by Dr Zaheer-Ud-Din Babar from the University of Auckland’s School of Pharmacy, also identified issues with access to prescribers, budgetary constraints, cultural and health literacy, patient medicine affordability and the evidence required for gaining subsidy for medicines. These findings come from the first independent study to identify medicine policy issues in New Zealand. The study consulted 20 stakeholder groups from a broad range of healthcare and policy institutions. “While overall there was reasonable satisfaction with the availability of subsidised medicines, there were some major challenges”, says Dr Babar. “In the context of PHARMAC’s fixed budget for procuring and subsidising medicines, there was reasonable satisfaction with the range of medicines available—rare disorder medicines being the clear exception,” he says. “There were concerns raised about the decision making process and whether...

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