Tag: Lincoln University

Massive market available for exporters if they can perform

Press Release – Lincoln University Massive market available for exporters if they can perform A Lincoln University expert says New Zealand exporters will have to be on their game to reap the benefits of a huge trade access deal which has gone under the radar. Faculty of Agribusiness …18 November 2015 Massive market available for exporters if they can perform A Lincoln University expert says New Zealand exporters will have to be on their game to reap the benefits of a huge trade access deal which has gone under the radar. Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce lecturer, Dr Eldrede Kahiya, says while the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) has dominated media recently, an equally significant trade-related development has gone largely unnoticed. In August New Zealand became part of the Global Procurement Agreement (GPA). Situated within the framework of the World Trade Organization, the GPA is designed to make it easier to compete for foreign government contracts. He says this opens up a $2.65 trillion market for New Zealand exporters willing, and able, to exploit the opportunities it presents. However, New Zealand exporters really need to lift their game and neutralise disadvantages they face, he says, such as the sometimes difficult process involved with accessing international markets, our smaller scale and lesser market presence, higher costs, and an innate favouritism towards domestic suppliers. “Selling to an overseas government is not unlike playing...

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Sobering address on state of the environment

Press Release – Lincoln University New Zealand and the world are failing to fulfil many of the basic principles of sustainability and we must face up to our situation in order to avert serious risks, warns renowned conservationist Emetrius Professor Sir Alan Mark.Sobering address on state of the environment New Zealand and the world are failing to fulfil many of the basic principles of sustainability and we must face up to our situation in order to avert serious risks, warns renowned conservationist Emetrius Professor Sir Alan Mark. Sir Alan, of the University of Otago, spoke to a packed lecture theatre at Lincoln University last week as keynote speaker for the University’s annual State of the Nation’s Environment Address. During his hour-long presentation on 30 September, he suggested that economic growth had become “an end unto itself rather than a means to a better life” and this attitude was bad news for environmental sustainability. “Many people assume that if we have a healthy economy, other aspects of well-being will follow,” he said. “Extreme wealth is considered a major sign of success. How do we achieve a sustainable economy with a financial system that requires growth for stability? “At the moment, we are living in a non-sustainable world and as Professor John Kay, of the London School of Economics has said, ‘the world economy is a ticking time-bomb and global markets...

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OECD Trade Leader Joins Lincoln Team

Press Release – Lincoln University Lincoln University today announced the appointment of Crawford Falconer to the inaugural Sir Graeme Harrison Professorial Chair in Global Value Chains and Trade. Mr Falconer is currently leader of the OECD Services Trade and Global Value Chains/Trade in Value …OECD Trade Leader Joins Lincoln Team Lincoln University today announced the appointment of Crawford Falconer to the inaugural Sir Graeme Harrison Professorial Chair in Global Value Chains and Trade. Mr Falconer is currently leader of the OECD Services Trade and Global Value Chains/Trade in Value Added (TIVA) projects, where he is overseeing two major research streams on services trade restrictions and the creation of value added in global value chains. Sir Graeme Harrison, Founder and Chairman of ANZCO Foods, is personally funding the Professorial Chair at Lincoln. “I am delighted that the University has secured someone of Crawford Falconer’s calibre for this position. Crawford comes with many years’ experience in trade negotiations and this experience will be invaluable when it comes to repositioning Lincoln as a thought leader in world trade,” says Sir Graeme. Mr Falconer was formerly the Deputy Secretary of the Trade and Economic Group of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT). As New Zealand’s senior trade official, he managed all trade negotiations between 2009 and 2011 – including WTO, TPP, Korea, Indian, GCC, ACTA, AFTA/CER – and all bilateral trade...

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Non-chemical pest control method showing exciting results

Press Release – Lincoln University Research on using non-chemical methods to control potato pests is delivering groundbreaking results. A newly published paper from the Biology Husbandry Unit (BHU) Future Farming Centre and Lincoln University, detailing the results of field trials, shows the use …Non-chemical pest control method showing exciting results Research on using non-chemical methods to control potato pests is delivering groundbreaking results. A newly published paper from the Biology Husbandry Unit (BHU) Future Farming Centre and Lincoln University, detailing the results of field trials, shows the use of a mesh cover over the plants was very effective in controlling tomato potato psyllid, or TPP, as well as reducing potato blight. One of the authors of ‘A field evaluation of the effectiveness of mesh crop covers for the protection of potatoes from tomato potato psyllid’, Dr Charles Merfield, says TPP can potentially cause severe crop loss due to phytotoxic saliva and transmission of the bacteria Candidatus Liberibacter Solanacearum. The bacterium is believed to cause diseases such as ‘psyllid yellows’ in tomatoes and potatoes, and ‘zebra chip’ symptoms in potato tubers. “The potential in the developed world to use mesh which is very safe, in place of chemicals, is very exciting,” Dr Merfield says. The arrival of TPP in New Zealand led to potato, tomato and pepper growers increasing their frequency of insecticide use, which disrupted integrated pest management programmes...

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The Southern Ladybird To Be Let Loose On A Potato Crop

Press Release – Lincoln University Media Release 8 March 2013 – for immediate release The Southern Ladybird To Be Let Loose On A Potato CropMedia Release 8 March 2013 – for immediate release The Southern Ladybird To Be Let Loose On A Potato Crop In seven years, a tiny sap-sucking insect called the tomato-potato psyllid (TPP) has caused major damage in the potato industry in New Zealand. Research conducted by the Bio-Protection Research Centre at Lincoln University, using the southern ladybird as a biological control agent, has shown the predator to be voracious and effective at reducing TPP numbers on glasshouse potatoes. On Wednesday 13 March, the first batch of these potent predators will be released on an organic potato crop in Hororata, as research moves from the lab to the field. The TPP, native to central America, is a tiny sap-sucking insect that causes damage to plants through feeding on leaves and transmitting a harmful bacterium. The TPP is also damaging the tomato, capsicum, eggplant and tamarillo industries. The current control method for TPP requires frequent applications of insecticides and there is potential that the TPP may become pesticide-resistant. It is not known how the TPP arrived in New Zealand. The ladybird is found throughout southern and central Australia and was introduced in New Zealand during the 1970s as a biological control agent of eggs of the eucalypt...

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