Tag: Disasters and Natural Events

‘In the Eye of the Storm’ Conference Begins

Article – Thomas Leaycraft On climate change: Whats the thing before you have a WTF moment? Thomas Leaycraft On climate change: ‘What’s the thing before you have a WTF moment?’ Thomas Leaycraft New Zealand needs to acknowledge that Pacific Island nations face “ecological holocaust” and “ecocide” thanks to climate change, says Dr Pala Molisa. Dr. Pala Molisa, Image Credit: Victoria University of Wellington Molisa, a lecturer in accounting at Victoria University, will be leading the open forum at the ‘In the Eye of the Storm’ Pacific climate change conference, which starts today. Dr. Molisa is also the MC of the conference. “One of the reasons we call this … conference ‘In the Eye of the Storm’,” Molisa says, “is that the Pacific is one of the places where the impacts of climate change will be most severely felt and first felt. We’re going to lose islands – we’re going to lose whole countries – because of rising sea levels … The Pacific is one of the most vulnerable areas to these super storms and extreme weather events.” The conference, which runs Monday-Wednesday this week, will provide an unconventional look at climate change. “It’s bringing amazing leaders and frontline activists from throughout the Pacific together,” says Molisa. The conference will discuss not only the immediate causes and effects of climate change but also the systemic issues behind it. Though a...

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Lyttelton Port development connecting NZ traders to the world

Press Release – New Zealand Government The redevelopment of the Lyttelton Port in Canterbury will play a significant role in the future economic growth and prosperity of the South Island by boosting jobs and trade, Deputy Prime Minister Bill English and Earthquake Recovery Minister Gerry …Hon Bill English Deputy Prime Minister Hon Gerry Brownlee Minister for Canterbury Earthquake Recovery 4 February 2016 Media Statement Lyttelton Port development connecting NZ traders to the world The redevelopment of the Lyttelton Port in Canterbury will play a significant role in the future economic growth and prosperity of the South Island by boosting jobs and trade, Deputy Prime Minister Bill English and Earthquake Recovery Minister Gerry Brownlee say. On the same day trade ministers from around the world signed the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement, Mr English formally opened the Cashin Quay 2 Wharf, an $85 million expansion that will increase the Port’s ability to grow trade in the coming decades. Mr Brownlee, Speaker David Carter and other dignitaries joined the celebrations. “The TPPA opens New Zealand up to 800 million potential customers and covers 36 per cent of global GDP. The expansion of the Lyttelton Port means the business is well placed to take advantage of this trade deal. “Imports and exports coming though Lyttelton Port account for 56 per cent of the total volume coming into the South Island, helping cement the...

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Emir Hodzic: No troubles in Godzone

Article – Emir Hodzic Being in New Zealand now, while the Middle East burns and Europe is overwhelmed with refugees, is like being on the other side of the planet. Well, New Zealand is actually on the other side of the planet. So far away in fact, that nothing disrupts Prime … No troubles in Godzone Emir Hodzic Being in New Zealand now, while the Middle East burns and Europe is overwhelmed with refugees, is like being on the other side of the planet. Well, New Zealand is actually on the other side of the planet. So far away in fact, that nothing disrupts Prime Minister’s “rebranding” project. Nothing except rugby, that is. Everything is fine and dandy in Godzone. Except, sometimes thousands of “uninformed” and “politically irrelevant” New Zealanders take to the streets in protest of the TPPA free trade agreement, and the unusual secrecy behind it. Unfolding human tragedy does make it to the 6 o’clock news, but it is so far away that it isn’t our problem. Most have accepted the Government’s explanation that we can’t afford to take more refugees, and some have even embraced good old-fashioned racism and bigotry. “All they will do is sit around dreaming of ways to kill us” one concerned Kiwi commented, “What you people need is a boot back to your nation, and fight your own way out, you...

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PM’s Presser: Saudi Sheep Scandal still Labour’s Fault.

Article – Francis Cook The Prime Minister today conceded he had gotten the numbers wrong about refugee intake on a radio interview this morning. Mr Key said there would be talks about raising the number but insisted that the cost runs up to $58m annually to settle refugees … PM’s Presser: Saudi Sheep Scandal still Labour’s Fault. Story, images and video by Francis Cook The Prime Minister today conceded he had gotten the numbers wrong about refugee intake on a radio interview this morning. Mr Key said there would be talks about raising the number but insisted that the cost runs up to $58m annually to settle refugees under our current quota. He said New Zealand is ranked 6th in the OECD for its refugee quota. UNHCR figures show New Zealand is 90th in the world in the total number of refugees we host per capita. Click for big version When asked about the recent floods, he said it was uncertain whether climate change was causing more extreme weather and the Government was not considering raising emergency protocols because of the costs to local councils. The funding provided from the Government would be for short term “fix-it” work. The costs of the floods, he expects, will run into the millions. Key also discussed the Saudi sheep scandal. He held fast to his insistence that the recently released papers from...

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Building better connections between Asia and the Pacific

Speech – New Zealand Government I am delighted to have the opportunity to speak at this International Conference on the Future of Asia.22 May 2015 Building better connections between Asia and the Pacific (speech delivered to 2015 Nikkei Forum, Tokyo, Japan, 21 May 2015) Minasan, Konnichiwa. Tēnā koutou, Tēnā koutou, Tēnā koutou katoa. I am delighted to have the opportunity to speak at this International Conference on the Future of Asia. New Zealand considers itself very much an active country of this region. New Zealand governments took a conscious decision, starting in the 1960s, to diversify our relationships away from traditional partners in Europe. In recent decades, we have drawn ever closer to Asia, economically, politically and culturally. Today I would like to talk about New Zealand’s place in the region and our approach to growing future engagement. New Zealand economy New Zealand is a small economy in global terms, but our economic performance in recent years has been strong. New Zealand experienced only a relatively shallow recession during the global financial crisis and has since returned to robust growth. We recorded almost 3 per cent annual growth over the past four years, and we remain on track for solid growth going forward. The government is seeking to ensure this growth is converted in sustained economic improvements over the long term. New Zealand already ranks highly in international surveys...

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